Do teachers believe in “neuromyths” just as much as everyone else?


There are some commonly held misconceptions in the general public about how the brain works and how it affects how we learn – these are often called “neuromyths.” We know that the general public can fall prey to these much of the time, but what about our educators? And if teachers believe in these neuromyths, what does it mean for how they teach, or how schools allocate their resources? And can we protect against falling for these neuromyths by better training?

Join me as I talk with Kelly Macdonald – doctoral candidate in clinical psychology at the University of Houston, and Asst Professor Dr Lauren McGrath at the University of Denver – both in the USA – as we talk about their paper exploring belief in neuromyths by educators and the general public, and how we can change things.

Here is the link to the full paper we talk about in this week’s show:

Here is the abstract for some context: There are some commonly held misconceptions in the general public about how the brain works and how it affects how we learn – these are often called “neuromyths.” We know that the general public can fall prey to these much of the time, but what about our educators? And if teachers believe in these neuromyths, what does it mean for how they teach, or how schools allocate their resources? And can we protect against falling for these neuromyths by better training?There are some commonly held misconceptions in the general public about how the brain works and how it affects how we learn – these are often called “neuromyths.” We know that the general public can fall prey to these much of the time, but what about our educators? And if teachers believe in these neuromyths, what does it mean for how they teach, or how schools allocate their resources? And can we protect against falling for these neuromyths by better training?

 

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